From Inside Our October, 2018 Newsletter

Dear Messiah Lutheran Church,


Even though the air is still muggy, fall is here! Hopefully by the end of this month, we’ll have some cooler weather.

As we roll into October, it’s always great to stop and think about what we believe at Messiah Lutheran. October 31, 1517, 101 years ago, Martin Luther nailed his 95 these to the door of the Catholic Church. His goal was to begin a debate, that would lead the church back to the scriptures to see God’s grace.

The church in Luther’s day based their relationship with God on works and a system that rewards you for doing good and punishes you for doing evil. Luther never felt like he could measure up. As he read the scriptures, Luther didn’t see a God that was ready to punish us, but rather a God that was ready to pour out his mercy on us. Luther saw a suffering servant, in God’s Son, Jesus, who took away that punishment. Luther was reassured in the gift of forgiveness that God had given us. He wanted the church to see this too.

So, this October, along with Luther we remember God’s grace and love that he showers upon us. For sermons starting on October 21st, we’ll be looking at the theme of Free to Live, God’s Act of Grace. Each week we will hear stories of God’s abundant grace toward us, focusing on the different ways in which we respond to his grace. The themes for each week are “By His Grace” (based on Romans 3:24), “God’s Varied Grace” (1 Peter 4:10), “My Grace is Sufficient (2 Corinthians 12:9) and “This Act of Grace” (2 Corinthians 8:9). I hope you will join us as we dig deeper into this theme of grace.

As we round out the end of the month, on October 28th, we will have our annual Fall Festival. This is a great time to join our neighbors, preschool families, and community to celebrate together. If you haven’t joined us, it’s a great time to get to know more people at Messiah. Bring yourself, or yourself and a trunk full of candy for the kids. It will be a great time to celebrate this grace together.


God’s Peace, Pastor Mark